Earlier this week, U.S. Senators Cory Gardner (R-Colo.) and Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) and U.S. Representatives David Joyce (R-Ohio) and Earl Blumenauer (D-Ore.) introduced the bicameral, bipartisan Strengthening the Tenth Amendment Through Entrusting States Act (STATES Act). The purpose of the proposed Act is to protect the rights of individual states, the District of Columbia, U.S.

On this auspicious April 20th, three developments in the world of cannabis regulation caught our attention.  The first is the unanimous recommendation by a panel of outside advisers to FDA in favor of approving Epidiolex, an epilepsy drug manufactured by GW Pharmaceuticals.  The active ingredient in Epidiolex is cannabidiol (CBD), which is a chemical found in cannabis that is not considered psychoactive.  If approved, Epidiolex would have orphan drug status, meaning that it is marketed to treat rare diseases or conditions, in this instance rare forms of epilepsy.  FDA is not bound by the advisory committee recommendations, but often follows them.

With Epidiolex’s approval likely looming, one question is what the impact will be on the CBD dietary supplements currently on the market. FDA has made clear that it does not believe that CBD can be legally marketed as a dietary supplement because of GW Pharmaceuticals’ initiation of investigational new drug applications for its products prior to CBD being marketed as a supplement.  Further, FDA has issued numerous warning letters relative to CBD labeled as dietary supplements but that contain little or no actual CBD as well as those that feature express disease treatment claims.  Will the approval of Epidiolex impact those CBD products currently sold as supplements?
Continue Reading Unanimous Recommendation for Cannabis-Based Epilepsy Drug; Trump Administration Lifts Threat of Cannabis Enforcement in States With Legalization; Schumer To Introduce Bill Decriminalizing Marijuana

As the gravitational pull toward marijuana legalization continues, new sources of revenue continue to emerge. Former Republican House Speaker John Boehner (and former opponent of legalization) recently announced that he joined the board of directors for a cannabis company, and sales of cannabis in California are expected to exceed $3.5 billion in 2018 and to surpass the $5 billion mark in 2019.  As a result, media outlets stand to gain substantial sums in advertising revenue for all the newly-licensed state legal businesses.  But before placing any advertisement, companies need to consider the rarely-used but newly-relevant provision of federal criminal law that addresses advertising.

Although seldom used in federal criminal prosecutions, a provision of the Controlled Substances Act prohibits placing advertisements for marijuana and other Schedule I substances. 21 U.S.C. § 843(c)(1).  Specifically, this provision makes it “unlawful for any person to place in any newspaper, magazine, handbill, or other publications, any written advertisement knowing that it has the purpose of seeking or offering illegally to receive, buy, or distribute a Schedule I controlled substance.” 21 U.S.C. § 843(c)(1).  So does that mean no one can run advertisements?  No, but it means that advertisements need to be approached with caution. 
Continue Reading Advertising Marijuana Businesses: The Federal Criminal Law You Need to Know

Timed almost to the day that California legalized recreational marijuana, Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced on Thursday, January 4, that the Department of Justice has rescinded the Obama-era guidance (the Cole Memo) issued to federal prosecutors relative to marijuana enforcement. The announcement characterizes the move as an effort to restore prosecutorial discretion, noting that the

On Thursday, the DEA announced a policy change expanding the number of DEA-registered marijuana manufacturers producing marijuana for research.  This move is expected to expand and diversify the supply of marijuana for research use.  Under the current policy, the only authorized marijuana manufacturer is the University of Mississippi, which operates under a contract with the

Last February, FDA issued three warning letters to companies marketing cannabidiol (CBD) products as dietary supplements. FDA reviewed the companies’ websites and concluded that claims that CBD products could treat post-traumatic stress disorder, lupus, cancer, and other conditions rendered the products unapproved new drugs.

This February, FDA again turned its attention to CBD products, issuing

The process for studying the potential medical benefits of marijuana became more streamlined on Tuesday, when the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services eliminated a controversial requirement for Public Health Service review of non-federally funded research protocols involving marijuana.

Historically, in addition to the standard FDA and Drug Enforcement Administration approvals needed for research