On June 25, 2019, Senator Ron Wyden (D-OR) issued a letter urging Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Alex Azar and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Acting Commissioner Ned Sharpless to take action by addressing the confusion and uncertainty surrounding the regulation of hemp-derived CBD. Specifically, Senator Wyden requested that FDA issue guidance

The Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (“TTB”) recently updated its guidance on inclusion of hemp ingredients in beverages containing alcohol. Here’s a summary:

• It remains TTB’s policy that it will not approve any formulas for alcohol beverages that contain ingredients that are controlled substances under the federal Controlled Substances Act.
• TTB

On March 5, 2019, FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D. and FDA/CFSAN Director, Susan Mayne, Ph.D., released new independent test results confirming asbestos contamination in certain cosmetic products sold by Claire’s and Justice retailers.  The agency also issued a safety alert warning consumers not to use the cosmetic products sold by Claire’s that had tested positive

The National Milk Producers Federation (NMPF) yesterday submitted a citizen petition to FDA related to the use of dairy terms such as “milk,” “yogurt,” “cheese,” “ice cream” and “butter” in the statements of identity for non-dairy plant-based substitutes. The petition argues that the use of these standardized dairy terms to name non-dairy foods falls short

This morning, the FDA announced its intention to engage in greater oversight of the dietary supplement industry.  The announcement also conveyed that the Agency had sent 12 warning letters and five advisory letters to companies over the prior two weeks.  Some of these letters were jointly issued by FDA and the Federal Trade Commission, focusing

The DEA announced last week that it is placing certain drug products that have been approved by the FDA and which contain cannabidiol (CBD) in schedule V of the Controlled Substances Act. The action places FDA-approved drugs that contain CBD derived from cannabis and no more than 0.1 percent tetrahydrocannabinols in Schedule V.

Schedule V

FDA recently released a new draft guidance, “Innovative Approaches for Nonprescription Drug Products,” that described two “innovative approaches” that sponsors of new drug applications may wish to consider to demonstrate the safety and effectiveness of nonprescription drugs.  In announcing the draft guidance, FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb explained that the agency sees an opportunity to “foster

In a remarkable and perhaps precedent-setting decision, a California appellate court sided with cereal manufacturers in ruling last week that Proposition 65 cancer warnings for acrylamide were preempted by federal policy encouraging the consumption of more whole grains.  In overturning a lower court ruling finding no preemption, the three-judge panel of the state appeals court gave remarkable deference to Food and Drug Administration policy and guidance which, the court stated, “contained persuasive reasoning why Proposition 65 acrylamide warnings on whole grain cereals would mislead consumers and lead to health detriments.”  The appellate panel found that the lower court erred in failing to give “weight to the FDA’s analysis and concerns regarding a Proposition 65 warning and the obstacles it would pose to the fulfillment of its statutorily-driven dietary goals.”  FDA also has expressed concerns that Prop 65 warnings should be deferred given the uncertainties about the actual risks to human health from acrylamide in food.

Acrylamide — the chemical at issue in the recent Prop 65 coffee imbroglio — is not naturally present in food products but is created by the Maillard reaction, which occurs naturally between amino acids and sugars at high temperatures.  A wide variety of food products, including most prominently baked and fried starches, contain acrylamide at relatively low levels, but nevertheless in amounts that may require a Prop 65 warning.
Continue Reading Prop 65 Court Win for Cereal Manufacturers Sets the Table for Further Challenges to Warning Requirements

On June 20, 2018, the FDA released draft guidance regarding the FDA’s Mitigation Strategies to Protect Food Against Intentional Adulteration Rule (IA Rule).  This is the first of three installments of guidance the FDA plans to release related to the IA Rule.

The new guidance covers the development of a food defense plan, which includes the following:

  • Vulnerability assessment: an assessment that identifies vulnerabilities in a facility’s food manufacturing processes and provides actionable process steps, which are places in the process where a facility can implement mitigation strategies to minimize or prevent the vulnerability;
  • Mitigation strategies: strategies that significantly minimize or prevent significant vulnerabilities at actionable process steps;
  • Food defense monitoring procedures: procedures, including the frequency with which they are to be performed, for monitoring mitigation strategies to assess whether mitigation strategies are operating as intended;
  • Food defense corrective action procedures: actions taken if the mitigation strategies are improperly implemented based on the nature of the actionable process step and the mitigation strategy; and
  • Food defense verification procedures: verification activities to ensure that monitoring is being conducted and appropriate decisions about corrective actions are being made.

This guidance covers the vulnerability assessment, mitigation strategies, and food defense monitoring procedures. Remaining FDA guidance will cover food defense corrective actions, food defense verification, reanalysis, and recordkeeping.
Continue Reading FDA Releases Guidance Regarding Strategies to Protect Against Food Adulteration

Making good on this April 20th announcement, Senator Chuck Schumer (D-NY) introduced legislation that would upend current federal regulation of marijuana. Specifically, the Marijuana Freedom and Opportunity Act removes marijuana from the list of scheduled substances under the Controlled Substances Act, effectively decriminalizing it at the federal level.  Under the bill, states would continue to have individual authority to regulate marijuana but federal authorities would be able to prevent trafficking between states where the substance is legal to where it is not and to oversee advertising to the extent necessary to prevent targeting ads to children.  Co-sponsors include Senators Bernie Sanders (I-VT), Tim Kaine (D-VA) and Tammy Duckworth (D-IL).

Highlights of the proposed legislation, per the Fact Sheet, include the following:

  • Decriminalize Marijuana: The legislation would decriminalize marijuana at the federal level by descheduling it, which means removing marijuana from the list of scheduled substances under the U.S. Controlled Substances Act of 1970;
  • Respect States’ Rights: The legislation would maintain federal law enforcement’s authority to prevent marijuana trafficking from states that have legalized marijuana to those that have not;
  • Level The Economic Playing Field: The legislation would establish dedicated funding streams to be administered by the Small Business Administration (SBA) for women and minority-owned marijuana businesses that would be determinant on a reasonable estimate of the total amount of revenue generated by the marijuana industry;
  • Ensure Public Safety: The legislation would authorize $250 million over five years for targeted investments in highway safety research to ensure federal agencies have the resources they need to assess the pitfalls of driving under the influence of THC and develop technology to reliably measure impairment;
  • Invest In Public Health: The legislation would invest $500 million across five years for the Secretary of Health and Human Services to work in close coordination with the Director of National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Commissioner of Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in order to better understand the impact of marijuana, including the effects of THC on the human brain and the efficacy of marijuana as a treatment for specific ailments;
  • Protect Children: The legislation would maintain the Department of Treasury’s authority to regulate marijuana advertising in the same way it does tobacco advertising to ensure the marijuana businesses aren’t allowed to target children in their advertisements. The bill also allows the agency to impose penalties in the case of violations;
  • Incentive sealing and Expungement programs: The legislation authorizes grant programs to encourage state and local governments to administer, adopt, or enhance expungement or sealing programs for marijuana possession convictions. The bill provides $100 million over five years to the DOJ to carry out this purpose.


Continue Reading Senator Schumer Introduces Legislation to Decriminalize Marijuana at the Federal Level